Infant, Child Adolescent and Parent Mental Health Services | Susan K. Schultz Ph.D.
Services

WHEN TO CONSIDER MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

No child is too young to refer and all parent concerns are appropriate to consider. Parents with concerns about how their child is developing, relating, or behaving are invited to call for a consultation appointment. Mental health services are also appropriate when a parent or primary caretaker feels burdened, worried or confused by the demands of parenting. 

For more information on my early childhood mental health services please go to www.infantparentpsychotherapy.com

Services address specific concerns including those listed here.

Infants and Toddlers

  • Fussy baby, excessive crying, difficult to soothe
  • Sleeping or feeding difficulties
  • Difficulty establishing routines
  • Developmental concerns, including medical issues and hospitalization
  • Concern about the relationship between parent and child
  • Stress or worry regarding the child or parenting
  • Change, loss, trauma or other life issues that affect parent, child, or the parent-child relationship

Preschool Children

  • Difficulty with routines of sleeping and eating
  • Behavioral concerns including tantrums
  • Concerns about mood, sensitivity, reactivity
  • Child is fearful or worried
  • Separation distress
  • Difficulties in child care setting or preschool
  • Parent-child relationship issues
  • Change, loss, trauma

School Age Children

  • Difficulties in transition to school
  • Worry, anxiety, fearfulness
  • Difficulties sleeping
  • Depression or other mood issues
  • Behavioral concerns
  • Difficulty adjusting to school or learning
  • Peer or friendship difficulties
  • Sibling or family conflict
  • Life events causing stress, trauma or loss

Adolescents

  • Difficulty managing stress, anxiety, depression
  • Transition to middle, high school or college
  • Academic, learning concerns
  • Difficulties in friendships, peer relationships
  • Behavioral difficulties
  • Concerns about sexuality, sexual orientation
  • Conflicts with parents
  • Traumatic events, losses, changes
  • Transition from adolescence to young adulthood

Parents

  • Difficulty in the transition to parenthood
  • Worry, stress or anxiety about a child or parenting
  • Parent depression or anxiety including perinatal mood disorders
  • Parent history of childhood abuse or neglect
  • Parent history of infertility, miscarriage, loss of a baby or child
  • Traumatic birth
  • Parenting difficulties or uncertainty
  • Interest in development guidance
  • Emotional relationship between parent and child
  • Sibling relationship difficulties
  • Change, loss, trauma affecting parent